Cover photo for Donald Jack Wood's Obituary
1938 Donald 2024

Donald Jack Wood

April 21, 1938 — March 18, 2024

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Donald Jack Wood (Don) passed away on March 18, 2024, surrounded by loved ones at his cozy cottage in Farmington, Utah. While he eventually succumbed to kidney failure, friends and family believe he died from a broken heart, having never fully recovered from the passing of his sweetheart just 3 years prior.   

Don was born in Preston, Idaho on April 21, 1938, to Jack and Jane Wood.   He was reared in Clifton, Idaho just a short drive away. He was one of five brothers, who were more like feral raccoons than obedient sons, serving as a constant reminder of the importance of family planning to their overwhelmed parents. Fortunately, his two sisters provided some balance to the scales.

To Don, Clifton was a paradise and sanctuary.   Nestled beneath the mountains and near the twin lakes, it provided the backdrop for an endless supply of mischievous escapades, everything a rambunctious young boy could ever hope for…to include all the “Oregon Trail” diseases, unfortunately those were also in endless supply.  Don managed to dodge diphtheria and typhoid and eventually tried to learn business at the feet of his father.  His dad owned the only pool hall in town.  Don admired his father and did what he could to support the family business.  The townsfolk would have many a lively night at the Wood poolhall and was on occasions like those when the Bishop would be heard telling the men to “leave their priesthood outside but remember to pick it up on the way home.” 

Don started tending bar at the family business at the age of 13, and quickly earned a reputation as a skilled pool player and reliable source of free ice cream and soda for his friends. The pool hall also had a makeshift boxing ring out front, where as a teenager, he discovered a talent for boxing the intoxicated locals looking to blow off some steam.  To his dying day he claimed to only have lost one bout, “to a young fellow, who hit me so hard it felt like I was kicked by a horse!!!” Knowing the shenanigans that often transpired here, it’s quite possible Don fought an actual horse that day.  Regardless, it’s probably safe to assume this experience inspired Don to try his hands at a less “punchy” profession.    

Upon turning 18, and feeling ready to see the world, Don joined the Army and was eventually deployed to Darmstadt, Germany.  He spoke fondly of his time in Germany, and grew to admire the culture, customs and people. Particularly their penchant for bratwursts, which he consumed with impunity.  

Dad eventually returned to the US, and after a number of wild adventures best swapped over a campfire rather than confined to a somber obituary, he found his life’s true purpose. Don married her on August 21, 1964, and he spent the rest of his days trying to live a life worthy of Stana’s love. 

Don had a rewarding career in the computer industry, where he enjoyed the friendship of some truly great minds. He brought that sense of wonder and dedication to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He served valiantly in many callings and found purpose and meaning in the Gospel.  He especially loved teaching, and in his later years derived much joy from sharing his testimony of the Savior to his “ward family.”  

In his spare time, Don could be found preforming in the local theatre, playing golf with his little brothers, skiing with reckless abandon and admonishing his fellow commuters to “slow down!”  The I-15 corridor was Don’s arch nemesis, and on those rare occasions he found himself in this “death trap,” he never shied away from the opportunity to educate the ignorant with universal, easy to interpret, hand signals.   

As he grew older, Dad became a voracious reader and took his own advice--slowing down to enjoy life’s journey.  He eventually swapped ski poles for a garden hose, and spent countless, meditative hours watering his lawn by hand, despite having a fully functional sprinkler system.  

Through it all, Don’s greatest source of joy was his family. Dad had an aversion to loud noises, surprises of any kind, and communicable diseases, basically the key ingredients of any child ages 1-18; yet he tried his best to put his anxieties aside and open his heart and his home to the wonderful chaos of family life.  Even if this meant desperately trying to find his “happy place” while presiding over yet another sugar-fueled 6-year-old birthday party.    

He often showed his love in unconventional ways, like riding the bus to work so his wife could have a car.  Or secretly taking on a second job, so his children could have a nice Christmas. He quietly served his family, doing everything he could to ensure no one was ever wanting.  “Are you warm enough dear?” was constantly asked of all of us.  He just couldn’t bear the idea of his family suffering.  

Every so often when overcome with nostalgia, Dad’s mind would wander to the past and he would speak of his childhood sanctuary.  He would yearn to return there and buy a small farm where he could live out the remainder of his days in peace and quiet.  But he wasn’t fooling anyone.  His heart was firmly planted in his little cottage on Spencer Way. His life played out here in ways he probably never could have imagined, and he didn’t regret it for a moment.  It was here, and nowhere else, where he wanted to spend his last dying days.   A wish that was granted just a few days ago.  

As Dad’s health started to decline, his oft repeated request was “to stay close to each other, and hold hands, until we meet again.” “Remember, I love you all more than tongue can tell.” 

At the time of his passing, Don had 19 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren.  He is survived by his daughters, Jodie Banks (Kevin), Tami Perucca (Mike), Amy Sorensen (Paige), Camille Tesch (David), and his son, Jonathan (Nicole) Wood.  

His siblings Thomas Wood, William Sput (Rose) Wood, David (Janet) Wood, Deborah Wood (Dave Nielsen), Myra (Ken) Peterson and his sister-in-law Kathy.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Stana; his parents Jack and Verna Jane Wood; his father and mother-in-law Stanford and LaRee Cowley; his brother, Robert; and his three grandchildren, Krista, Cody and Katie.

Funeral services will be held at Lindquist’s Kaysville Mortuary, 400 N Main Street, on Monday, March 25, 2024 at 11:00 am. Friends may visit with the family at the mortuary on Sunday, March 24, from 6 to 8 pm and Monday from 9:30 to 10:30 am.

Interment, Farmington City Cemetery 

Services will be live-streamed and may be viewed by scrolling to the bottom of Don’s obituary page at www.lindquistmortuary.com

To order memorial trees or send flowers to the family in memory of Donald Jack Wood, please visit our flower store.

Service Schedule

Past Services

Viewing

Sunday, March 24, 2024

6:00 - 8:00 pm (Mountain time)

Lindquist's Kaysville Mortuary

400 N Main St, Kaysville, UT 84037

Enter your phone number above to have directions sent via text. Standard text messaging rates apply.

Viewing

Monday, March 25, 2024

9:30 - 10:30 am (Mountain time)

Lindquist's Kaysville Mortuary

400 N Main St, Kaysville, UT 84037

Enter your phone number above to have directions sent via text. Standard text messaging rates apply.

Funeral Service

Monday, March 25, 2024

11:00am - 12:00 pm (Mountain time)

Lindquist's Kaysville Mortuary

400 N Main St, Kaysville, UT 84037

Enter your phone number above to have directions sent via text. Standard text messaging rates apply.

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